Cooking with Maine Women Writers: Standard Baking Co. Pastries

June 11th, 2014 by Laura Taylor

Have you had a morning bun from Standard Baking Co.? Have you perused their cookbook – Standard Baking Co. Pastries? If not, I highly recommend it. Their morning buns are one of my very favorite foods…ever. Made with croissant dough, then stuffed with cinnamon and brown sugar (and nuts, if you like), they are sweet, flaky and delicious. Imagine my delight when I received their cookbook for Christmas last year and realized that the morning bun recipe was in there. Oh the possibilities!

They’re a terrifically indulgent treat (hello, butter!) and they take quite some time to make, so they definitely won’t be making it onto my regular breakfast schedule. Normally, I post the recipes I’ve made here for you to try at home but in this case, I’m not going to – it’s far too long and involved. The buns start with butter croissant dough – the ingredients list is short but the instructions are long. There are many steps, requiring a bit of planning and forethought.

For those of you who’ve never made croissant dough before, the process is lengthy but not especially complicated. It starts with a yeasted dough, which is left to rise for a bit. The dough is then wrapped in plastic and transferred to the refrigerator for at least 4 hours. Following this resting period, a large square of butter is wrapped in dough and rolled out, then folded and allowed to rest in the refrigerator for an hour or so. The dough gets rolled out and folded several times (call “laminating”), with an hour’s rest in between each folding/rolling, which is what makes the process so lengthy. It’s not an especially complicated or difficult process, but it definitely requires a certain investment of time. When the dough is finally ready, it rests in the refrigerator for another 2 hours before shaping. (Alternately, it can be frozen for up to 10 days and then thawed overnight before shaping, which is what I did.)

At this point, it can be shaped into croissants or…morning buns! To make the morning buns, the dough is rolled out one last time, then covered with a cinnamon and brown sugar mixture. You roll it up and slice it into 12 pieces and then put each piece in a buttered muffin tin into which has been placed a teaspoon of the cinnamon sugar mixture and some chopped walnuts, if that’s your thing. (I love the addition of walnuts, but my kids don’t, so I did half of each.) The buns are left to rise again, then baked. Finally they’re tipped out of their tins onto a piece of parchment paper and all that delicious melted cinnamon/sugar/nut mixture drizzles down.

This was my first attempt at making croissant dough and I’m incredibly pleased with how it turned out. The buns were amazing – the whole family agrees! The instructions were clear and well-written and, despite the fact that I’m a pretty regular baker, I do think someone without much (or any) baking experience could follow these directions without too much difficulty.

The authors of the cookbook, Alison Pray and Tara Smith, gave a great lunchtime talk at Portland Public Library last week, where they discussed how they got into baking, the process of writing a cookbook and the local food scene in Maine, among other topics.

It was fascinating to hear a behind-the-scenes account of writing a cookbook, particularly one devoted to baking. The process takes years. They have to scale down recipes from bakery-quantities to home cook-quantities – most home cooks don’t need to make a batch of hundreds of cookies. (Delicious though that may be.) They convert ingredients from weights to measures for the convenience of the home cook who generally uses measuring cups and spoons instead of a scale. (If you have a kitchen scale, use it! The results will be more accurate and consistent.) They have to do research to make sure the ingredients required are commonly available to the home cook. The recipes were tested – by the authors, bakers, family members, friends – and re-tested to make sure that they were clear and could be easily followed by folks who don’t have any baking experience at all. (This is likely why the directions for laminating the croissant dough are so lengthy – so those of us who’ve never done it before feel comfortable attempting the process!) The cookbook was edited and proofread repeatedly. (It’s probably a good idea to make sure the instructions don’t direct you to add salt by the cupful to a recipe for biscotti.)

The pair also talked about a typical day in a bakery and gave some interesting statistics on the volume of baking involved. For instance, during a typical week in the summertime, the bakery will make 300 bags of molasses cookies. At 8 cookies per bag, that’s 2400 cookies, all shaped and rolled in sugar by hand. (That’s 150 lbs of dough, if you’re wondering.) And that’s only one of the numerous varieties of cookies. And that’s just cookies – not to mention breakfast pastries, tarts, cakes, other snacks and, of course, bread. Having never worked in a bakery, this is just mind boggling to me!

I was quite pleased to see that they had (as I’d hoped they might) brought along a few samples for the crowd at the library. I didn’t arrive in time to snag a molasses cookie but the chocolate one I was able to get was delightful.

I think perhaps I’ll next have to attempt the molasses spice cookies at home…or perhaps coconut macaroons? So many delicious choices…