Seal Release Recap 4.1.12

Thanks to ALL that came out to join us today.  Lovely weather and an even more lovely crowd.  We were honored with the support.  Aside from the fact that 300-400 people joined us on the beach, we are so gracious that we were able to raise over $1200 to benefit future seals at MARC.   Just $1 can buy a pound of fish for the seals!  You can’t begin to imagine how much this sum of money helps us out.  You’re all awesome.

Our volunteer, Marissa, shared some great shots of the release (click to enlarge the pics).

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Onlookers waiting for the seals to arrive

Making their way to the sand

Capelli being released by her adopter, Will

Grey seals aren’t known to be the swiftest of critters on land.   Especially with the pups, it can take a few minutes for them to figure out how to make their way to the water…especially when they have 800 eyes watching them.

Team meeting! Which way should we go?

Though it took Capelli and Rigatoni a few minutes to adjust to the audience and orient themselves towards the ocean, once they realized that there was water in front of them… they headed for the surf.

Capelli heading for the surf

Though not visible in the above photo, Capelli, the youngest grey seal we’ve ever seen at MARC, is wearing a satellite tag glued to her back.  The temporary tag should give us daily information about where she is hanging out for the next few months.  The website should be active soon, so you’ll be able to watch her moves at Whalenet.

Capelli (left, female) and Rigatoni (right, male)

The first splash always feels so good. And Cold!

Sometimes, getting to the destination is about the journey.  Someone on the beach asked why it would take so long for the animals to get to the water, and why Capelli, specifically, was hugging the shoreline even after she made it to the water.  For these young pups, life in the wild was minimal, a mere day or weeks, prior to coming to the MARC hospital.  They may be seals by nature, but a release at this young age means entering into a big unfamiliar world.  We always expect the pups to take a period of time for post-release adjustment to their new home.

Finally at sea.

Again, thanks to all who came out to show your support.  We hope to see you again at the next one!

We did hold one seal back that we felt could have gone out today, but later decided would benefit from another few days at the “seal spa”.  We hope to release him in the next few weeks.

 

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