UNE Provides Social Determinants of Health training in Bangor as part of a five-year $2.5 million Federal Grant to Improve Rural Health Care in Maine

December 6th, 2016 by healthinnovation
Bangor area UNE graduate students from medical, pharmacy, and physician assistant programs attend a Social Determinants of Health training as part of a 5 year grant to improve primary care education.

Bangor area UNE graduate students from medical, pharmacy, and physician assistant programs attend a Social Determinants of Health training as part of a 5 year grant to improve primary care education.

In July of 2016 the University of New England’s (UNE) Center for Excellence in Health Innovation was awarded a five-year, $2.5 million federal grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to partner with Penobscot Community Health Care (PCHC) to transform the primary care workforce in rural and underserved Maine and improve health outcomes. As part of the HRSA PCTE grant PCHC clinical preceptors and UNE students in the Bangor area attend a series of five training sessions. The trainings will cover interprofessional education, social determinants of health, oral health for primary care, health literacy, and shared decision making with patients. Each session is designed to provide students an opportunity to train together, learn the skills needed for exemplary interprofessional, and team based care.

On November 30th, the second student training session was held on the social determinates of health, presented by UNE faculty member and epidemiologist Jennifer Gunderman, MPH. “The training was aimed at creating an awareness in students that they have a critical role in addressing the social determinants of health in the population in which they serve”, explained Jennifer. “We cannot expect better health outcomes unless we get to the root of health issues such as income, education, housing, access to a healthy environment, etc.”

The training hosted students from several disciplines, “The UNE Clinical IPE training on social determinants of health was really educational and fostered great discussion among the PA, COM and Pharmacy students” said Morgan Harper UNE COP student. “The main points that I took away from this training were ways to assess patients based on their social determinants of health (income level, education, housing status, etc.) and where or who to connect them with once a need is identified. These are skills I will be bringing with me into my future clinical rotations and clinical career as a pharmacist.”

Future HRSA PCTE trainings will combine both students and preceptors. The next HRSA PCTE training scheduled in February will be led by UNE’s Dr. Timothy Martinez who will discuss oral health.

 

Penobscot Community Health Care (PCHC), with nearly 70,000 patients, is Maine’s largest Federally Qualified Health Center. It has nine primary care practices and 16 clinical service sites including a flagship clinic in Bangor, a Health Care for the Homeless clinic and shelter, a Clubhouse program for those recovering from mental illness, a geriatric practice serving long-term care facilities, a 340B pharmacy, and other practices ranging from Jackman to Belfast, Maine. Providing care for one-third of all Mainers served by federally-funded community health centers, PCHC is also a Teaching Health Center with Level 3 NCQA Patient-Centered Medical Home designation. Located in Bangor, its service area is over 8,500 square miles, spanning Penobscot, Somerset, and Waldo counties, which include some of the poorest and most rural areas of Maine – a population of 135,000. 82% of PCHC’s service area is designated as rural or frontier. For more information, visit http://pchc.com/

The University of New England is Maine’s largest private university, an innovative educational community with two distinctive coastal Maine campuses, a vibrant new campus in Tangier, Morocco, and a robust offering of degree and certificate programs online. UNE is home to Maine’s only medical and dental schools—part of a comprehensive health education mission built on a pioneering interprofessional approach that includes pharmacy, nursing and an array of allied health professions.

FMI: Contact Dora Anne Mills, M.D., UNE’s Vice President for Clinical Affairs and the Principal Investigator at dmills2@une.edu or Melanie Caldwell Project Coordinator at PCTE_Info@une.edu.

Center for Excellence in Health Innovation Receives Funding to Evaluate Maine Chronic Disease Self-Management Education

December 6th, 2016 by healthinnovation

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Ruth Dufresne, S.M., Research Associate and Adjunct Faculty in the Center for Excellence in Health Innovation, received a new grant from the US Administration for Community Living and the Administration on Aging to evaluate Maine’s Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) Program. The grant, implemented by Spectrum Generations along with four other Maine Area Agencies on Aging organizations, delivers evidence-based self-management education programs in the community that empower older adults and adults with disabilities from underserved areas and populations to better manage their conditions.

Spectrum Generations, one of the five Maine Area Agencies on Aging (M4A), serves seven counties in the central and mid-coast Maine area. Their mission is to promote life-long learning, health, wellness, nutrition, community engagement and the social well-being of all older and disabled adults. With seven locations, Spectrum Generations provides services for older and disabled adults spanning from nutrition education, adult day care, legal services, to community case management. The other four area agencies on aging, Aroostook Agency on Aging, Eastern Area Agency on Aging, SeniorsPlus, and Southern Maine Agency on Aging, will be providing support in implementing the CDSME program in their affiliated areas.

The Administration on Aging reports that nearly 60% of CDSME participants have more than one chronic condition. The most common conditions are: hypertension (41%), arthritis (37%), and diabetes (32%). The average age of a CDSME participant is 65.6 years, and 46% of participants report having a disability. “This grant provides Maine’s Area Agencies on Aging with an opportunity to strengthen its CDSME infrastructure through collaboration with sustainability partners such as health systems, insurers, and employers,” states Dufresne, “This expansion will contribute to an increase in the number of older adults and adults with disabilities that have access to CDSME, ultimately allowing them to better manage their conditions.”

Heather Doran, M.S., Research Assistant, and Ruth Dufresne, as the Evaluators for this two-year $74,000 grant, ensure data integrity, quality assurance, and perform rapid-cycle quality improvement to strengthen CDSME programing, improve health outcomes and decrease healthcare costs. Both qualitative and quantitative data will be collected to evaluate progress toward grant objectives. Pre- and post- surveys will be collected from CDSME participants to determine change in knowledge, attitudes and skills. Focus groups and interviews will be conducted with Spectrum Generations and the other Maine Area Agencies on Aging to better understand the successes and challenges of program implementation.

 

For more information, contact: Ruth Dufresne, rdufresne@une.edu, 221-4571

Enhance your Substance Use Disorder screening knowledge: Free SBIRT training from UNE’s IPEC and SAMHSA

December 6th, 2016 by healthinnovation

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Please join us as UNE launches a three-year grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to train health professions students and practitioners in the field in the Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) tool for Substance Use Disorders. SBIRT is an approach to the delivery of early intervention and treatment to people with substance use disorders and those at risk of developing these disorders.

The first training grant of its kind in Maine, Collaborative SBIRT Training for Maine’s Future Health Profession Leaders is a three-year grant which utilizes an interprofessional approach to the development and implementation of training programs to teach UNE students across 8 health professions the skills necessary to provide evidence-based screening and brief intervention as well as referral to treatment for patients who are at risk for a substance use disorder (SUD). Additionally, the training will develop the leadership skills needed in order to champion the implementation of SBIRT throughout our healthcare system with the ultimate goal of helping clients avoid substance use disorders. Training for clinical faculty and preceptors of UNE students is a critical part of the grant – please plan participate remotely or come to the Portland campus for this free training in December.

 

Friday, December 9 | 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. SBIRT 101* Livestream only http://stream.une.edu/events/

 

Wednesday, December 14  | 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. SBIRT 101* Livestream http://stream.une.edu/events/ or in person in Ludcke Auditorium, Portland Campus

 

Wednesday, December 14  | 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. SBIRT: Hands-on training: practical exercises and role play opportunities. Livestream http://stream.une.edu/events/ or in person in Ludcke Auditorium, Portland Campus

*Watch the SBIRT 101 program Dec. 9 or 14 then join us on campus for in-person for additional training, role-play opportunity and resources!

 

Thursday, December 15 | 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Adding SBIRT to your curriculum. Livestream http://stream.une.edu/events/ or in person in Blewett 108, Portland Campus

 

If you plan to attend in person, or would like to receive Continuing Education Unit documentation for participating, please RSVP no later than December 10 to SBIRT@une.edu. Parking passes can be requested with RSVP.
This event can be Livestreamed to your computer, or you are welcome to attend in person.

Public Health Managers complete management training through UNE’s New England Public Health Training Center

December 5th, 2016 by healthinnovation
Katherine Boss (4), Nicole O’Brien (1), Leslie Ouellette (1), Jessica Shaffer (7), Jessica Eyles (2); Rindy Fogler (2), Tera Pare (3), Tonya Philbrick, Cheryl Cichowski (3), David Pied (3), Grace Cleaves (6); Garrick Brown (1), Patty Hamilton (2), Judith Johnson (5), Elizabeth Pratt (1), Holly Lasagna (4), Elaine Beaulieu (2), LuAnn Thibeau (1) (1-University of New England, 2-Bangor Public Health and Community Services, 3-Maine CDC, 4-Healthy Androscoggin, 5-Portland Public Health, 6-Beyond Clinical Competence LLC, 7- EMHS)

Participants of the Public Health Management Training: (Front to Back and Left to Right) Katherine Boss (4), Nicole O’Brien (1), Leslie Ouellette (1), Jessica Shaffer (7), Jessica Eyles (2);
Rindy Fogler (2), Tera Pare (3), Tonya Philbrick, Cheryl Cichowski (3), David Pied (3), Grace Cleaves (6);
Garrick Brown (1), Patty Hamilton (2), Judith Johnson (5), Elizabeth Pratt (1), Holly Lasagna (4), Elaine Beaulieu (2), LuAnn Thibeau (1)
(1-University of New England, 2-Bangor Public Health and Community Services, 3-Maine CDC, 4-Healthy Androscoggin, 5-Portland Public Health, 6-Beyond Clinical Competence LLC, 7- EMHS)

Over the past three months, a group of 21 Public Health managers from across the State participated in a six session Public Health Management training course entitled Managing Effectively in Today’s Public Health Environment. The management training was supported by the New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC). The NEPHTC offers public heath workforce development through public health trainings in six New England states. The University of New England’s Center for Health Innovation is a local performance site for the NEPHTC, administered through Boston University’s School of Public Health and supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

The management training was designed to build skills in managing staff, budgets, projects and partnerships. Participants were comprised of emerging, new and experienced Public Health staff, managers and directors bringing a wealth of knowledge and interest to the training. The training course was divided into three lunch-time webinars and three day long sessions at Maple Hill Farm in Hallowell. Throughout each session participants gained skills and explored new tools to manage public health programs, lead high performance teams and effectively hire new staff. The importance of resiliency was discussed throughout the program. The six training sessions included the following topics: Trends, Opportunities and Resistance; Recruiting and Hiring; Coaching, Developing, and Managing Performance; Conflict Management and Collaboration; and Budget, Financial and Project Management.

The training was facilitated by lead trainer Grace Cleaves of Beyond Clinical Competence, LLC and included content knowledge experts Mike Miles and LuAnn Thibeau. The course organization and delivery were administered and implemented by Karen O’Rourke and Nicole O’Brien, in conjunction with Boston University.