Professor Elizabeth De Wolfe’s Guest Blog Post at Wikipedia Educational Foundation

Elizabeth De Wolfe, Professor of History at UNE, recently published a guest blog post on the Wikipedia Educational Foundation’s blog. In her post, Professor De Wolfe, charts the history and evolution of her decision to involve students in her “Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies” course in a Wikipedia publication project, her experience working with the Wikipedia Educational Foundation, and her students’ reported experiences with the project.

Wikipedia Educational Foundation.

Professor De Wolfe’s project, an outgrowth of work begun in the Spring 2015 Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar at UNE, represents some of the best of what UNE is doing with the digital in humanities courses.

Professor De Wolfe’s blog post can be accessed at https://wikiedu.org/blog/2016/06/22/make-history-empower-students/

DH Faculty Seminar at Work

In one of the final meetings of the Spring 2016 Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar, Sarah Gorham (Arts) led participants in the creation of mini artistic books. A form of stress-relieving art therapy, the books offered faculty in the seminar a small window into some of the creative work that Gorham’s students will engage in as they take her DH-inflected course, The Painted Book, in 2016-17.

As Gorham led the faculty through the creative project, she recorded the activity. Later, she edited the video to create an example of the sort of documentary she imagines some students might develop to capture and present their creative process as a component of the DH-inflected course. This is the video she produced.

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Spring 2016 DH Faculty Seminar Participants

Four faculty received awards to participate in the second Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar, “Digital Literacies and the Liberal Arts at UNE,” in Spring 2016. Robert Alegre (History), Steven Byrd (Languages), Sarah Gorham (Art), and Sean Ramey (English) are spending a semester exploring pedagogies and projects that embrace the digital. Seminar participants, selected on the basis of their proposals, sample relevant literature in their fields, develop a digital project for a targeted undergraduate Core course, and include a plan to assess the impact of the project on learning and engagement. Michael J Cripps, associate professor in the Department of English and project principal investigator, leads the seminar.

From left, Michael J. Cripps, Robert Alegre, Steven Byrd, Sean Ramey, and Sarah Gorham.

From left, Michael J. Cripps, Robert Alegre, Steven Byrd, Sean Ramey, and Sarah Gorham.

The Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar is part of a three-year, grant-funded effort to encourage faculty to embed digital projects in Core courses, to support student writing development through a writing fellows initiative, and to mainstream developmental writers. It involves new partnerships with UNE’s Student Academic Success Center and is supported by two new mobile learning labs. The grant was received from the Davis Educational Foundation established by Stanton and Elizabeth Davis after Mr. Davis’s retirement as chairman of Shaw’s Supermarkets, Inc.

Call for Proposals – Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar, Round Three

In Spring 2016, UNE will offer the last of three semester-long digital humanities faculty seminars to support the incorporation of digital pedagogies and student projects in Core courses.

Download the Call for Proposals (PDF) – Deadline for Proposals, October 19, 2015

Funded in part by a generous grant from the Davis Educational Foundation, “Digital Literacies and the Liberal Arts at UNE” will bring up to five faculty from humanities and social science disciplines together to explore possible uses of digital tools and pedagogies in a Core course of their choosing.

Faculty participating in the seminar will sample literature on digital pedagogies and projects in their fields and develop a relevant digital assignment for a targeted undergraduate Core course. Additionally, they will build a plan for assessing the impact of the project on student engagement and learning.

In a subsequent semester, faculty will offer the revised course, assess the digital project’s contributions to learning, and share their work with the campus community via a report and panel discussion. Projects that emerge from the work of the seminar will also be featured on the Digital Humanities at UNE website.

Seminar participants will receive a three-credit course release in the Spring term (or equivalent overload compensation) and will be eligible for travel support to present their work in the seminar (and in their chosen Core course) at a regional or national conference.

Faculty interested in the seminar should submit a complete proposal by October 19, 2015. Participants will be notified of their acceptance by October 30, 2015.

In 2015, Beth deWolfe (Department of History and Philosophy), Theo Dunfey (Citizenship office in the Department of Society, Culture, and Languages), Owen Grumbling (Department of Environmental Studies), and James Roche (Department of Political Science) participated in the seminar and are currently implementing digital projects in at least one Core course they teach this year. In 2014, Ayala Cnaan (Department of Society, Culture, and Languages), Jennifer Denbow (Department of Political Science), and Eric Zuelow (Department of History and Philosophy) participated in the inaugural faculty seminar. Faculty seeking a participants’ perspective on the seminar are encouraged to reach out to one or more of the previous seminar participants.

Spring 2015 DH Faculty Seminar Participants

Four faculty receive awards to participate in the second Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar, “Digital Literacies and the Liberal Arts at UNE,” in Spring 2015. Elizabeth deWolfe, Theo Dunfey, Owen Grumbling, and James Roche are spending a semester exploring pedagogies and projects that embrace the digital. Seminar participants, selected on the basis of their proposals, sample relevant literature in their fields, develop a digital project for a targeted undergraduate Core course, and include a plan to assess the impact of the project on learning and engagement. Michael J Cripps, associate professor in the Department of English and project principal investigator, leads the seminar.

DHSeminarPartipants_spr15

From left, James Roche (Political Science), Owen Grumbling (Environmental Studies), Theo Dunfey (Citizenship), Beth deWolfe (History), and Michael J. Cripps (English).

The Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar is part of a three-year, grant-funded effort to encourage faculty to embed digital projects in Core courses, to support student writing development through a writing fellows initiative, and to mainstream developmental writers. It involves new partnerships with UNE’s Student Academic Success Center and is supported by two new mobile learning labs. The grant was received from the Davis Educational Foundation established by Stanton and Elizabeth Davis after Mr. Davis’s retirement as chairman of Shaw’s Supermarkets, Inc.

Call for Proposals – Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar, Round Two

In Spring 2015, UNE will offer the second of three semester-long digital humanities faculty seminars to support the incorporation of digital pedagogies and student projects in Core courses.

Download the Call for Proposals (PDF) – Deadline for Proposals, October 17, 2014

Funded in part by a generous grant from the Davis Educational Foundation, “Digital Literacies and the Liberal Arts at UNE” will bring up to five faculty from humanities and social science disciplines together to explore possible uses of digital tools and pedagogies in a Core course of their choosing.

Faculty participating in the seminar will sample literature on digital pedagogies and projects in their fields and develop a relevant digital assignment for a targeted undergraduate Core course. Additionally, they will build a plan for assessing the impact of the project on student engagement and learning.

In a subsequent semester, faculty will offer the revised course, assess the digital project’s contributions to learning, and share their work with the campus community via a report and panel discussion. Projects that emerge from the work of the seminar will also be featured on the Digital Humanities at UNE website.

Seminar participants will receive a three-credit course release in the Spring term (or equivalent overload compensation) and will be eligible for travel support to present their work in the seminar (and in their chosen Core course) at a regional or national conference.

Faculty interested in the seminar should submit a complete proposal by October 17, 2014. Participants will be notified of their acceptance by October 31, 2014.

In 2014, Ayala Cnaan (Department of Society, Culture, and Languages), Jennifer Denbow (Department of Political Science), and Eric Zuelow (Department of History and Philosophy) participated in the inaugural faculty seminar. Faculty seeking a participants’ perspective on the seminar are encouraged to reach out to one (or all) of last year’s seminar participants.

Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar, Week Two

The Spring 2014 Digital Humanities Faculty Seminar launched last week.  If the vigorous discussion of week one offers any indication, the term promises to involve a healthy dose of critical engagement with the texts and practices in DH.

Beginning with a reading of the Digital Humanities Manifesto 2.0, seminar participants found much to dislike in that representation of the digital humanities. Mostly, the critiques raised important questions right in the center of the digital humanities, with challenges to the strong criticism of intellectual property, the “wisdom of crowds” elements, the “scholarly” contributions of digital archival work and humanities computing, and the sense that DH is really revolutionary. The jury is still out on the value of engaging the “Manifesto” as a first reading in a seminar of this sort.

In addition, participants got busy creating, and the reflective blogs emerging from the seminar participants are worth a read:

  • Badass Humanist – Dr. Eric Zuelow’s seminar blog
  • Winter Mute – Dr. Ayala Cnaan’s seminar blog
  • JMD – Dr. Jennifer Denbow’s seminar blog

To keep the blog posts front and center, we have subscribed to the blog RSS feeds and placed them right in the sidebar of the site.

In week two, we invested considerable energy into sharing planned projects and exploring paths forward. The tone was considerably less aggressive, and participants shared lots of good ideas.  As the discussion unfolded, it became clear that the syllabus contains many elements that will likely prove quite useful for participants.

For those interested in the reading selections for the seminar, the syllabus is online.